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His tweet followed a piece on Fox News about South Africa's planned land reforms - and he tagged Fox News host Tucker Carlson.

President Donald Trump came to the defense of white South African farmers Wednesday in a tweet that suggested they are targeted for "large-scale killing" over the country's land reform policy.

In this photo from October 30, 2017, people place white crosses, representing farmers killed in the country, at a ceremony at the Vorrtrekker Monument in Pretoria, South Africa. More recently, Fox News's Tucker Carlson, one of the president's favorite conservative cable news pundits, has taken up the cause.

Meanwhile, the Economic Freedom Fighters (EFF) leaders, Floyd Shivambu, described Trump's utterance as madness and labelling him a racist bigot.

Jones compared the elected government of South Africa to Hitler during an episode of his show "InfoWars" broadcast several hours before Trump's tweet.

Partially as a result of this, and partially because of other economic legacies of Apartheid, white South African households remain 5.5 times richer than their black counterparts on average.

The plan aims to address racial disparities, as whites still own most of South Africa's land more than two decades after the end of apartheid.

As it happens, the consultation just closed, and the South African government said Thursday that Parliament would consider the results. So, facing pressure from rivals in the far-left Economic Freedom Fighters (EFF) party, the ruling African National Congress (ANC) recently chose to move towards claiming white-owned farmland without payment.


This comes after President Cyril Ramaphosa stated in Parliament on Thursday that he did not agree with the Economic Freedom Fighters' position on the nationalisation of land, and that the government had chose to embark on a process of rapidly releasing land which belonged to it.

"We are aware of these reports and have been following this issue very closely for some time".

Global wire service Reuters reported that South Africa remains a country that is deeply racially divided and unequal almost a quarter of a century after Nelson Mandela swept to power at the end of apartheid, and that Trump's comments were supported by right-wing organisations such as AfriForum in South Africa. South Africans are grappling with the hard issue of land reform through an open process including public hearings, broad-based consultations, and active civil society engagement.

For years, a small but vocal group of white South Africans have claimed white farmers are the target of violent, racially motivated farm attacks.

The proposed seizure of land is a concern to many in South Africa, especially given the fact that the country's economy is in recession, and the issue will most likely become an even one bigger closer to next year's election.

How has South Africa responded?

In June Moody's - the last of the top three credit agencies to rate the country's debt at investment grade - said uncertainty around land and mining reforms risked limiting investment.


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