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Facebook announced a new optional feature on Tuesday that will alert you of photos posted on the social media platform that you're in, even if no one has tagged you in the photo.

"There may be photos that exist that you don't know about", he told Wired. Finally, the company is also going to use facial recognition to describe pictures to the visually impaired; someone looking at a photo using a screen-reader can hear which of their friends are in the picture by name. Users can turn facial recognition on or off on Facebook. If you've already opted out of that feature, you will also be automatically opted out of the new facial recognition features.

Joaquin QuiƱonero Candela, director of applied machine learning at Facebook, notes that if you are in a photo and are part of the audience for the post, you'll now be notified, even if you haven't been tagged.

If you aren't in the audience, Candela says, you won't receive a notification.

For users who are not convinced that the multibillion-dollar corporation has their best interests at heart, Facebook is adding a simple on/off button for its facial recognition features, which users can access through their account settings. The objective of the scanning, according to Facebook, is to alert you if someone has publicly uploaded a photo of you that you don't know about, especially if they are trying to impersonate you.

The feature builds on technology Facebook already uses to suggest tags or labels for people in photos users post. When photos and videos are uploaded to Facebook, they are compared to images in the template to determine if there is a match.

The new settings will appear on Facebook platforms everywhere, with the exception of Canada and the European Union, where the company doesn't offer facial recognition.

"When it comes to face recognition, control matters". Facebook has a long, very unfortunate history of keeping what you delete and making getting it off Facebook as hard as humanly possible.

Facebook also introduced new tools to try to prevent harassment Tuesday.

Facebook says the feature is rolling out now, except in Canada and the EU.

"The words "face recognition" can make some people feel uneasy, conjuring dystopian scenes from science fiction", wrote Rob Sherman, Facebook's deputy chief privacy officer.